Book Corner: What are you reading today?

“Reading (portrait of Edma Morisot).” Berthe Morisot, 1873.

Here’s a space to tell the club what you’re currently reading. You’re welcome to use the comments below.

We’re not including a Linky box because we want to encourage clubbers to meet here now and then, and talk together as a group.

No pressure, of course! But if you’re feeling social, here’s a space to tell us about your latest classic. As always, you are of course welcome to leave a link to your blog if you prefer to share there.

Twitter hashtag: #ccreadingupdate

– The Club

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49 thoughts on “Book Corner: What are you reading today?

    • Is that Dante or Brown? I half read, half listened to The Divine Comedy on Kindle. I enjoyed the fact it’s such an old book. As for Dan Brown, I am actually reading his Inferno at the mo.

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  1. I’m reading the Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy. It is a very long read, but fairly engaging. I am reading it because it is on the 1001 Books to read before you die and I am trying to make my way through as many of them as I can.

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    • I read this a number of years ago after watching the wonderful BBC production with Rupert Graves, Gina McKee and Damian Lewis. I loved both at the time.

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  2. I have two books going at the moment: Put Out More Flags by Evelyn Waugh and, on the nonfiction front, Romantic Moderns by Alexandra Harris, which looks at various British artists and writers of the early- to mid- twentieth century.

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  3. I have 4 books on the go right now – crazy but true! Childhood of Jesus by Coetzee, Cooked by Michael Pollan, A World of Other People by Steven Carroll and book 2 in the Shadowfell series by Juliet Marillier. The way it usually works is that I dip in and out of the books until one suddenly takes control of my reading life.
    In the past couple of days, the Marillier book has taken over as I’ve become swept up in the drama unfolding for Neryn and Tali.

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    • I JUST started the first Shadowfell book! Another Juliet Marillier fan, huh? I have read most of her books- the Sevenwaters Trilogy is my favorite. I didn’t realize the second book was already out! I am sucked into it as well- it’s been two days and I’m almost finished. What are some of your favorite Marillier books (if you’ve read others)?

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  4. Glad to see A.C. Doyle is being read (Riv at Bookish Realm) this month, May 22 is Doyle’s birth date. I’ve been reading his supernatural short stories which are not as popular as his Sherlock novels but they are fascinating. So, do celebrate this master writer this month of May, which is also National Short Story Month. I’m featuring one of his shorts “John Barrington Cowles” on my blog this week (supernatural intrigue and romance) and it’s getting an increase in hits so readers are interested in remembering him. Cheers for Arthur Conan Doyle!

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  5. I am reading “Hound of the Baskervilles” by A. C. Doyle in May, but I’m a bit behind my readalong schedule at the moment. Otherwise I finished off two titles from my personal Classics Club list this month already – “The Blind Assassin” (Atwood) and “Something Wicked This Way Comes” by Ray Bradbury. So I’d already call it a successful month 🙂

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  6. I’m just about finished with A Glass of Blessings by Barbara Pym. I’m re-reading all her books for the Pym centenary & this is by far my favorite, at least so far. Prose so pitch perfect I’ve gone back and re-read chapters after finishing them just to luxuriate in the details. Can you tell I love this book?

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    • I spotted a Pym readalong for the 1-8 June hosted by Fig and Thistle & My Porch.
      I have Excellent Women which I’ve been meaning to read for ages…just not sure how I’m going to fit it in!

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  7. I’m reading Capote’s In Cold Blood right now, and I think it’s very interesting. We know from the beginning who would be the victim and the murderers, but we don’t see how they can be connected. I love how Capote slowly reveal the connection by describing psychological aspects of all characters.

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  8. I’m not reading a classic right now, but the last one I read was A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain. I was very impressed with the book. Hank Morgan was a little too self-satisfied for me, but the ending was a shocker. It’s now one of my favorites 🙂

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  9. I’m trying to read Les Testaments Trahis by Milan Kundera. It’s hard going. He’s often way over my head. But I’m persisting. And breaking up the struggle with different tales by Roald Dahl whom I’m just discovered… :0)

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  10. I’m reading ‘The Great Gatsby’ :). I’m really glad I got it on this past CC Spin!! I’m really enjoying it so far! I’d forgotten how short it is!

    I’m also slooooooowly making my way through Les Mis. It’s going to take me awhile!

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    • I have just reread The Great Gatsby (the 2nd time) right before watching the latest movie, and it was a perfect decision because the movie can really relive the book! Good luck with your Les Mis… 😉

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    • It’s hard to go wrong with the Gatsby. I reread it a couple of months ago – I’d forgotten just how good it is.
      Glad you’re enjoying it too 🙂

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  11. I’ve taken a month off reading classics, as I reached my 10 books a year ahead of my anniversary date, next Monday. I’ll be back on the wagon in June with my first ever Austen read, P@P. Can’t wait.

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  12. I’m usually extremely dense about poetry, but I’m trying to break up my reading list with a book of poems by Edna St. Vincent Millay. On the side, I’m reading a non-fiction book about DNA, Sam Kean’s The Violinist’s Thumb (which is pretty interesting so far!) My Spin pick was Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, so that’ll be up next.

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  13. I’m reading ‘The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood’ by Howard Pyle, this is my Spin book. I am also reading Wednesdays in the Tower, by Jessica Day George.

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  14. I’ve almost finished To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. It’s not very often that I read classics, but I loved this one! It puts you to think about subjects as children’s innocence and them being so misunderstood, (and, naturally, the big subject of racism) and even though it sets foot around 80 years before, it turns out that our ways of growing up haven’t really changed. It even reminds me of how I felt in my own childhood. Whenever I read such a great book, I feel like I shouldn’t say anything about it, because no matter how praiseful I am, I feel like the book is too grand to be described by someone with my (lack of) vocabulary and intelligence!

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    • I know what you mean Elise. I read TKAM for the first time at school when I was 15. It was one of those ‘ah-ha’ moments when I realised this is what they (all the teachers and adults in my life) meant when they talked about “literature”.

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  15. I’m reading Solzhenitsyn’s “In the First Circle,” which is huge, and I’m going a bit slowly. I’ve also discovered the joy of reading Frazer’s “The Golden Bough” on my tablet, with large print, rather than in my old copy with its tiny print. I am quite fond of my aged hardback, but it seems I can’t actually *read* it.

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  16. I’m reading “The Great Gatsby” which I am reading for the first time along other reading guide that talks about the author, past reviews on this novel and much more. Then, Jonathan Swift will follow, but I did not decide yet what to read yet. If you have any suggestions let me know. Thanks.

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  17. I’m currently re-reading The Grapes of Wrath. I first read it a few summers ago. I’m re-reading for a few reasons. 1. I’ve been thinking about a summer of re-reads. 2. I am from Oklahoma and the recent tornadoes made me think about this book pretty intensely. 3. I want to break my habit of flitting from book to book, rarely finishing anything, so I thought reading a book I know I love would be a good place to start. 4. It’s on my Classics Club list, so I’ll actually be making some progress there.

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  18. Multilingual day reading: Le Rhino Céros d’Or ( 2013, F. Fauvelle-Aymar) french
    Congo ( 2010, D. van Reybrouck ) dutch
    Mary Queen of Scots ( 1969, A. Fraser) english

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  19. I’m reading George Orwell’s “The Road to Wigan Pier”, it’s a non-fiction book about the coal miners’ living standards in the mid 1930’s. So far it’s fascinating. Orwell’s prose is simple but poignant and does not spare any detail on the precarious situation the workers were living in (also, full of statistics and pictures).

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