10 Year Celebration Questionaire

10 years ago today, The Classic Club Blog was born!

Adam, Allie, Heather, Jillian, Melissa and Sarah were our foundation moderators, who guided us through the first six years with LOTS of fabulous ideas, events and enthusiasm. All designed to get us excited about reading classics together.

Four years ago, The Classics Club experienced a changing of the guard.

Brona, Deb, Kay and Margaret arrived with a new bout of enthusiasm, refreshing the blog and working behind the scenes to update member and review information. And suddenly, here we are with 10 years of blogging about classics behind us!

During that 10 years, bloggers have also come and gone. That’s life in this blogging world. We love that after 10 years, new members are still finding their way to us and that older members continue to circle around as their schedules permit.

So what does the future hold for us at The Classics Club?

In these uncertain times, it can be hard to think about anything much beyond our immediate concerns. But that is why we are readers. Books bring us solace and comfort during trying times. Classic books, in particular, can help us to understand our time and place in history and give us a perspective other than our own. They help remind us that nothing about human nature is new or hasn’t been experienced before.

We will stay here at The Classics Club as long as the rest of you want to keep reading classics with us.

To celebrate our 10 years of blogging about Classics, we want to know more about YOU. New members and old.

  • Share a link to you blog and/or classic club list/s.
  • Answer the 10 questions below.
  • As always we are very flexible about how and when you do this.
  • Tweek, add or subtract the questions to suit you best.
  • Have fun!

The Questions

  1. When did you join the Classics Club?
  2. What is the best classic book you’ve read for the club so far? Why?
  3. What is the first classic you ever read?
  4. Which classic book inspired you the most?
  5. What is the most challenging one you’ve ever read, or tried to read?
  6. Favourite movie adaptation of a classic? Least favorite?
  7. Which classic character most reminds you of yourself?
  8. Has there been a classic title you expected to dislike and ended up loving? Respecting? Appreciating?
  9. Classic/s you are DEFINITELY GOING TO MAKE HAPPEN next year?
  10. Favorite memory with a classic and/or your favourite memory with The Classics Club?

You can answer the questions in the comments below or at your own blog, then post your link below. We can’t wait to meet you all and catch up with old friends.

^ Photo credit: Julia Taubitz on Unsplash

23 thoughts on “10 Year Celebration Questionaire

  1. Congrats and much gratitude to all the moderators over the years for keeping this club going. Here are my answers:
    When did you join the Classics Club? – I think the year after I started blogging, so 2015.
    What is the best classic book you’ve read for the club so far? Why? – I have a hard time identifying one book as the “best”. So many were impressive for different reasons. So I think I have to pass on this one.
    What is the first classic you ever read? – The first “grown-up” classic that I remember reading and enjoying is Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. I was assigned it in school, and unlike most such assigned books that I found terribly boring, I was riveted by Steinbeck’s brief yet emotionally wrenching tale.
    Which classic book inspired you the most? Jane Eyre inspired my senior comprehensive project in college, and I still think of it often for its psychological insights and inspiring story of empowerment.
    What is the most challenging one you’ve ever read, or tried to read? Don Quixote was a challenge due to its length. It helped when I realized it was really published as two books, ten years apart, and gave myself permission to break it up.
    Favourite movie adaptation of a classic? Least favorite? From childhood I adored The Wizard of Oz and watched it every year. I still think it’s actually better than the book in many ways. On the minus side,the bloated Hobbit Part I was a blatant attempt to cash in on the success of the LOTR films that left me cold.
    Which classic character most reminds you of yourself? Sophie Hatter in Howl’s Moving Castle.
    Has there been a classic title you expected to dislike and ended up loving? Respecting? Appreciating? Mrs Dalloway — I did not get on with Woolf’s style at all for the first half or so, and then it suddenly clicked and I loved it.
    Classic/s you are DEFINITELY GOING TO MAKE HAPPEN next year? I’m not making any promises about anything for next year!
    Favorite memory with a classic and/or your favourite memory with The Classics Club? Readalong of Don Quixote (yes, the most challenging one) with Emma of Words and Peace. I do not think I would have gotten through it without that little push of companionship. And that’s what I appreciate most about the Club in general, the sense of having companions on the way, as we try to make sense of books and life and our crazy world. Thanks for being there!

    Liked by 8 people

  2. Happy 10th, and thanks to all the moderators, past and present!
    I’ll have a little think about the questions and either post on my blog or pop back and post here – always so difficult to pick “bests” when it comes to classics, isn’t it?

    Liked by 8 people

  3. 1. I have been a member since 2014 and am working on my third list.
    2. Although I have read many good classics as a member of the club, I think my favorite so far is The Long Ships by Frans G. Bengtsson, because it was such a surprise. It was a romp of an adventure and funny besides.
    3. I don’t remember what the first class I ever read was, maybe The Secret Garden.
    4. I don’t feel that this question applies to me.
    5. The most challenging was Moby Dick. I tried to read it twice before finishing it, and I didn’t like it.
    6. There are too many good movie adaptations of classics to answer this question. I think my least favorite was the version of Persuasion where they made Fanny too perky. They totally missed the point of the book.
    7. Maybe Dorothea Brooks reminds me of myself a little, although I’ve never been that earnest or naive.
    8. Maybe, but I’m blanking.

    I’ve run out of steam. I think 10 open-ended questions may be too many.

    Liked by 10 people

  4. Hip hip hooray for TEN years!! Here’s to another ten!

    I am new to The Classics Club, starting my journey in January of this year. I’m right on track, so far, (a bit ahead, actually!) having read and reviewed ten books on my list. Two bloggers I follow are active members and it was through their posts that I was inspired to join in. It’s definitely made me step out of my comfort zone and read some books I might never have considered before!

    I love all these questions, but it might be too soon for me to answer most of them. As for my first classic? I guess that all depends on one’s definition of “classic”. I learned to read before I began school, so maybe Hop On Pop by Dr. Seuss? 😉

    Liked by 8 people

  5. Llongyfarchiadau, as it’s said in Wales! A splendid achievement – and what you say about classics bringing solace and comfort, helping us to understand and giving us alternative perspectives is all spot on, as well as what you say about human nature.

    Me joining the Classics Club? A year or two before the new team took over, though I’ve yet to finish even my latest ‘new and revised’ list, to my shame.
    Best classic so far? I can’t choose, possibly *all* the Austen and Brontë fiction I’ve read up to now.

    I’ve stalled on far too many, stuttering and restarting the likes of Moby Dick and Middlemarch. As time goes on I seek out shorter and shorter novels and novellas – that’s growing old for you, and soon I’ll become my own classic!

    Liked by 9 people

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