Your Lucky Spin Number Is…

If you joined the game last week, find number 18 on your CC Spin #24 List! That’s the CLASSIC you are challenged to read by 30th September, 2020

We know it can be hard to stay on track and enthused about your Spin Book for the whole journey. We plan to provide support and encouragement to all our CC Spinners via twitter, fb, instagram and goodreads. We hope you can join us in cheering everyone on to finish another fabulous classics reading experience!

If you’re struggling with your book, let us know. We’ll do everything we can to help you through. Perhaps one of your new moderators has read it, or we can link you up with another Classics Clubber who has.

As always, the prize is the reading experience. 

What’s Next?

Tell us below what your number 18 title is:

  • Are you feeling thrilled, hesitant or ‘meh’ about your title?
  • Check out our ‘Reviews By Members’ page for other Classic Clubbers who may have read your book recently. They may be able to help you if you hit a speedhump in your reading.
  • Cheer on your fellow Clubbers.
  • Take a pic of your book and pop it on Instagram or twitter.
  • If you can — it would be fabulous if everyone posted about their Spin book by the  30th September, 2020.
  • Then check back here to share your experience and add your review to our ‘Reviews By Members’ page.

Hashtag: #ccspin  #ccwhatimreading

78 thoughts on “Your Lucky Spin Number Is…

  1. My #18 this time was The Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen Minor Works. I had wanted to read this during Jane Austen July but didn’t get to it. So now I will!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I’ll be reading Death Comes for the Archbishop. Happily, I picked a copy up at the used bookstore the other day so I’m good to go.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s wonderful, one of Trollope’s best! It’s the second in the Barchester series. If you want you can read the first book, The Warden, but it’s not absolutely necessary. The Warden is pretty short and not Trollope’s best, but it does set up the action for BT. I hope you like it!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Of the unread books on my club list The Castle of Otranto is the 18th in order, so Horace Walpole it is! It’s actually a reread but this time I shall give it my closest attention.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I got The Narrow Road to the Deep North and Other Travel Sketches by Matsuo Bashō! It’s one of the shortest books on my list and I’m really looking forward to reading it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trying not to boast…but I read this book whilst in Japan 2 yrs ago, as I travelled along some of the roads and rivers that Basho trod all those years. Sadly it is one of those books that I have been unable to review in a way that satisfies me…so it languishes in my draft folder….

      Liked by 3 people

  5. Deacon King Kong – James McBride – SPIN!!
    THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER AND OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK
    ‘A hilarious, pitch-perfect comedy set in the Brooklyn projects of the late 1960s. This alone may qualify it as one of the year’s best novels.’ The Washington Post

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hm… I wonder if I should join in next time. I’m just not sure I have enough classics on my shelves to fill a list of 20. But I tell you what… I just bought a copy of Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf and I am certain I can finish it by the end of September (it is short). Can I kind of lurk/join?

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  7. My book is Far From the Madding Crowd – I was hoping it would be this as my last Spin book was also by Thomas Hardy – The Return of the Native, which I loved. So I am delighted!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I loved this one. I did the audio. And be sure to watch the movie with Carey Mulligan after. (But I love to watch the films after reading. I know many do not)

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  8. I’ll be reading From Here to Eternity by James Jones. It’s 816 pages! Didn’t realize it was so long. I’ve read a fair amount of post-WW1 fiction by veterans but not much post-WWII fiction by vets, so that’s one reason this novel is on my list. I’ll no doubt watch the movie, too.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. Very excited about my spin pick! I got Troy Chimneys by Margaret Kennedy, which I’ve been wanting to read — mid-century historical fiction about a Victorian man researching his Regency ancestors — three of my favorite time periods in one book! I might not be able to wait until September to read it. I have so many great books on my list I might just power through and try to finish the whole list for the end of the year.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. wow, got a fat one: The Sleepwalkers, by Hermann Broch, 656 pages. I really have no idea what I’m getting into, lol. Happy with the challenge, plus I haven’t read an Austrian classic for a long time.
    Goodreads says, “Hermann Broch established himself as one of the great innovators of modern literature, a visionary writer-philosopher the equal of James Joyce, Thomas Mann, or Robert Musil.” It has been on my TBR for 7 years, so its about time

    Liked by 4 people

  11. I had been secretly hoping for my Annotated Pride and Prejudice so that I could pretend that I was still doing Austen in August, but equally delighted to get A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle. I have yet to read any of the Sherlock stories and I’m keen to have a good reason to get started on them.

    Liked by 8 people

    1. I love the Sherlock Holmes mysteries, so I hope you enjoy! I agree that some of the other novels are better, and I think the short stories (of which there are many) are my favorite, so I hope you enjoy your first foray into Holmes, and if this one doesn’t quite live up to expectations, it does get better (in my opinion anyway)!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. As the father of historical fiction (my favourite genre), I really should read a Scott soon, and not just keep reading the books of the longlists from the prize named in his honour!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I agree! BTW, tried to comment on your blog yesterday, but something was wrong. It may have been my connection. I was just seeing your links and not your images, and I couldn’t get Comments to work.

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    1. I had to google this one, as an Australian, I had never heard about this book or the author before…but now I’m intrigued. My brief trip to Mexico 4 yrs ago has given me a taste for Mexican literature and the Mexican perspective.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Mine is LOOKING BACKWARD: 2000-1887 by Edward Bellamy. I think I read it (decades ago) in college, and revisiting it should be interesting.

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  13. Mine is War and Peace! Luckily I’m already well into it. I joined a group reading 1 chapter per day at the beginning of the year, so have already read 800 or so of the 1350 – glad to have a push to just keep going and finish it!

    Liked by 8 people

    1. Are we in the same W&P reading group? With Nick? I’m loving my reread of W&P but the war chapters can be a bit of a slog at times.

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      1. Yes! I have found the one chapter a day thing annoying, so tend to leave it for a week or 10 days and then catch up, and maybe try to get ahead it they’re interesting chapters. Have also started watching the BBC series on dvd to picture the characters better. Now looking forward to romping through!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes, I tend to save my chapters for the weekend too. Some nights after work, I’m simply too tired to tackle W&P. Every time I google certain characters or events from the book for clarification, I continually get links for the BBC series. It looks sumptuous.

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    1. I won’t tell you then how many times I have failed to finish this book. I’ll wait for a lover of the book to drop by and encourage you the right way 🙂

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    2. Well… I’ve read it THREE times and it is the ONLY book I’ve ever re-read! You aren’t your husband, so maybe you’ll love it! My husband recommended a book to me recently that I just couldn’t finish. No two people read the same book!

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        1. That’s the Samuel Butler prose translation I believe. It gets rave reviews on the ‘which translation should I read’ sites. I’ve only read the Penguin version by E V Rieu, which doesn’t rate so highly and was certainly a chore to get through. I have the Fagles verse edition to try for one day….

          Good luck 🙂

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