The Classic Meme 2.0

 

Hello Clubbers!

Way back when, in 2012, the Classics Club came into being. A monthly meme was devised to bring clubbers together to chat about classics. A question was posed for you to ponder and discuss. You could write a blog post and leave the link or simply put your thoughts in the comments.

In recent times, no doubt thanks to a certain virus disrupting our regular lives, I’ve had a few requests to revive this tradition. I have struggled to keep my own blog going, let alone anything else during this time. This post contains no pressure or expectation for widespread participation. Everyone is going through their own thing right now. But if you feel like engaging in a classic bookish chat, then feel free to jump on board The Classic Meme 2.0.

This is the 2020 reboot.

Our latest question for you to ponder, comes courtesy of FictionFan:

Which classic author have you read more than one, but not all, of their books and which of their other books would you want to read in the future?

As always, we are very relaxed about how you interpret the question.

The idea is to have fun, talk classics and get a little social.

We welcome any suggestions for future discussion topics in the comments below.

 

43 thoughts on “The Classic Meme 2.0

  1. I started an author page on my blog to keep track of the authors I want to read ALL of their books one day!
    http://bronasbooks.blogspot.com/p/author-challenge.html
    I have 11 Dickens to go, 11 Willa Cather’s, 20 Wilkie Collins, 11 Edith Wharton’s (OMG! I thought I’d read all her fiction! I got that horribly wrong!!), 8 Virginia Woolf’s, and 15 Zola”s plus his 7 stories not part of the Rougon-Macquart series.
    Obviously, when I retire, I will be doing nothing but reading classics!

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    1. You have only listed Dickens’ novels – I think have read them all now except for Barnaby Rudge, but in the collection I inherited, I also have books called Sketches by Boz, Speeches, American Notes; Pictures from Italy, Stories and Sketches, Christmas Stories, Reprinted Pieces, The Uncommercial Traveller, and A Child’s History of England. I still need to read most of these.

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  2. I have to say Dickens. I have read most of his works, starting with Oliver Twist when I was 12. He was my very favourite author for many years, and we had to study several in depth at school (A Tale of Two Cities, Hard Times and Bleak House) but there are a few I have still not read. Next on my list will be Barnaby Rudge.

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    1. I’m about half way through Dickens’ books as well. I’d love to reread David Copperfield and A Tale of two Cities one day as well!

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  3. I suppose for me, the most obvious answer is Charles Dickens I’ve read half his novels, working on #9 now, Nicholas Nickleby. Favorites are A Tale of Two Cities and David Copperfield, with Bleak House being a close third. The only thing I haven’t loved is The Pickwick Papers.

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    1. My mom and daughter and I went to Dickens house/museum On Doughty (sp) in London many years ago. I bought silhouettes of characters and A Christmas Carol

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  4. 2020 is the 100th anniversary of Hercule Poirot’s first story. I have read many books by Agatha Christie, but not all. So this year, I ave decided to and started LISTENING to all of the Hercule Poirot canon. I’m almost done with book three (which is a collection of short stories actually). I’m discovering some fascinating elements, and hope to be able to share them with you very soon.

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  5. Excited to see so much recommendation for Shute! I might be reading A Town Like Alice later this year.

    I’d probably have to go with Joseph Conrad. I’ve read most of his major works and some of his minor ones, but I’d still like to read The Secret Agent, Almayer’s Folly, and Chance. His writing has its flaws, but his ability to develop complex situations and characters is really fascinating.

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  6. Several years ago, I read my first Edith Wharton: Ethan Frome. I think I was drawn in by her realism, so I read Summer. From then on it’s been one after another. Last year I made a commitment to read everything she’s written. I am about 7 novels and many novellas in. Her work is complex, insightful and mostly pessimistic at the end. But I am madly in love 🙂

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    1. I think I have read pretty much all of Wharton’s fiction now, maybe a couple of the lesser known ones tucked away on my e-reader. I struggled with her non-fiction though – found her pompous and superior and had to stop, so that I didn’t spoil my love of her fiction!

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  7. I haven’t read any Nevil Shute so although it doesn’t answer the question I think I ought! Every George Eliot I’ve read I’ve loved but in different ways, and there are still a couple to go so I’ll choose her. But there are lots of authors I’d like to read more of: Dickens, Jane Austen, Thomas Hardy, Trollope the list goes on . . .

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  8. Charlotte Brontë: I’ve read the first three of her novels but not the last, yet I’m getting desperate to read her juvenilia — Glass Town / Verdopolis and Angria. Also Henry James, as I’ve only read some of his novellas.

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  9. Well, since it’s my question I suppose I’ll really have to answer it! My choice would be Thomas Hardy, I think, though the discussion so far has reminded me I’d like to read more Nevil Shute too, having thoroughly enjoyed On the Beach a year or so ago. But then there’s also Graham Greene… and Sir Walter Scott… and HP Lovecraft… and I think I need to give this more thought… 😉

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      1. I love his writing but have read very few of his books. Every time I feel like a bit of Hardy, I have a terrible tendency to re-read Tess for the zillionth time instead of one of the ones I’ve never read!

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        1. Yes, that happens. It’s the same when you revisit a great restaurant, meaning to try something else on the menu, and ordering the same exact plate every time. Ugh!

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  10. Good question! It looks as if a Neville Shute trend is beginning, which is great! I would add anything by Charles Dickens, noting that there are a lot of his books to work through, George Orwell and Truman Capote.

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  11. I also want to read more Nevil Shute, and I’m still working my way through the novels of Anthony Trollope — he wrote 47 novels, plus short stories and nonfiction, so it’ll take a while! I also really liked Wilkie Collins who was also prolific.

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  12. Great discussion starter! I would consider Willa Cather as a possibility since I began looking more closely at her body of work after reading My Antonia. I have her One if Our Own languishing on my TBR. Another author is Nevil Shute. I read On the Beach and want to look into his other books as they still garner praise. I am tracking down his a Town Like Alice, and will view the film adaptation.

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    1. I started reading Nevil Shute last year, he’s wonderful. So far I’ve read five of his novels, my favorites are A Town Like Alice and Pied Piper (I did read On the Beach but it was the first month of lockdown and it was a poorly timed). Many libraries have them for digital download.

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      1. Our library will have to interlibrary Shute, but he is on my list. Yes, my usual appetite for dystopian and apocalypse stories has greatly diminished.

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