The Classics Club Lucky SPIN Number! #ccspin

Click for details about the Spin.

We promised you a spin number this morning, and here it is!

Your Spin Number is . . .

4!

If you joined the game last week, find number 4 on your Spin List! That’s the title you are challenged to read by December 31, 2017. We’ll toss a post up on that day to see who completed the game.

As always, the prize is the reading experience. Details here.

In case anyone asks — it would be awesome if everyone posted about their Spin book on December 31. But that’s not mandatory or anything. If you want to, though, have at it! 🙂

Check in below if you played. What’s your #4 title? Are you glad, hesitant, excited about your title? Do tell!

Twitter hashtag: #ccspin

– the Club

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142 thoughts on “The Classics Club Lucky SPIN Number! #ccspin

  1. Hmm, it’s Hall Caine’s “The Manxman,” which looks interesting, but is kind of long, so I keep putting it off! I guess now is the time. As soon as I finish the other book I just started — story of my life. I’m sure I’m not alone in that!

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    1. Actually got started on “The Manxman,” and so far am really enjoying it! Caine seems like a real observer of human nature. And it’s always fun to discover someone new.

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  2. I got Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset. Always wanted to read. However, it is a trilogy, so rather thick with small text! Anyway, hopefully make it until the end of the year.

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  3. My first spin – I’ll be reading Far From The Maddening Crowd. I’m a bit nervous – Hardy tends to be depressing for me. Better to read it in a happy time of year than in the depth of winter, though!

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    1. I personally love Hardy, although the stories tend to be depressing, I agree. This one is slightly different though. There is a wonderful film with Alan Bates and Julie Christie and a remake lately with Carey Mulligan and Matthias Schoenaerts.

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  4. I’ll be reading Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell. Not exactly a comfort read I’m sure! But I have been meaning to read it for ages.

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  5. I got The Well of Loneliness which I’ve been meaning to read for a long time, I just need to battle through my library books so I can get ti it soon.

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  6. I will be reading My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin. I’ve wanted to read the book since the 1970s when I saw the movie with Sam Neill. My mom thought I was just like the main character, I guess because we are both headstrong and have frizzy hair. Ha!

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  7. Nooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!! The Catcher in the Rye!!!! How could you do this to me??? What have I done to deserve it??? Why didn’t anyone stop me from putting it on my list??? I blame… everybody!!!!!!

    Just off now to have my exclamation mark key replaced… 😉

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      1. Thank you! 😀 Oh, I hope you find you do enjoy 1984, though – I think it’s a great book and it’s much more about people and emotions than its reputation suggests. Good luck!

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    1. Woohoo! Moby-Dick is my second favorite book of all time (after The Little Prince). Go into it with an interest for whaling and only a little interest for the plot. Readers often expect a fast paced adventure. As long as you mentally prepare yourself for something literary I think you’ll enjoy it. Good luck!

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    1. I’m confident you’ll love it more than you expect. It’s not just about politics, it’s about people. And once you’ve read it, as a reward you can watch the film with the wonderful Richard Burton! 😀

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    2. Same here. I honestly forgot I’d thrown in on my list. Woke up Friday morning and saw the number had been picked. I eagerly navigated to my Spin post and went “Wha….?” Oh well. At least it’s encouragement to read a book I’d probably never get to otherwise.

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        1. She devotes a couple of chapters to interesting analysis of Agnes Gray and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. Ellis argues Agnes Gray is a much more realistic picture of a governess’ experience of that time than Jane Eyre…

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