Group Check-In #18 – April 2016

What is this? Click to find out.

Hi Clubbers! How’s the reading going? Check in with the group below!

Tell us about your project — or you! Introduce yourself. Chat.

Tell us what you’ve read, how you’re feeling about your progress, how much you love the classics or the community — any struggles, a favorite read so far. Really, whatever you feel like sharing!

Some people prefer writing an update at their own blog and linking it here in the comments. That’s fine, too.

Feel free to respond to one another in the comments below — ask questions, visit each other, tell us you are new to the club, planning to join the club — etc. This is a meet and greet.

If you’re having trouble with your list and need encouragement, say that! That’s understandable. We want new classics readers to join us, so there’s nothing wrong with arriving to this thread with all of the newness showing!

(Please also note the “check-in” feature here is entirely voluntarily, intended for those who like weighing in with others in the group, and having a periodic place to reflect upon goals for the club. For some this feature would feel like an unwanted intrusion. Silent participation in this group is of course welcome!)

Thanks for all of your enthusiasm about this project!

New? Introduce yourself to the group on Twitter using hashtag #ccintroductions @ourclassicsclub. You can also introduce yourself here at the blog. 🙂


Twitter hashtag for reading check-ins: #ccreadingupdate

Note that if you’re on Twitter, you can also tweet your latest classic book reviews to the group using hashtag #ccbookreviews.

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15 thoughts on “Group Check-In #18 – April 2016

  1. Well, I just finished my 38th book and am feeling pretty good about my progress, I have to say. I’m confident I’ll finish long before my deadline of December, 2018, and as my list has swollen to nearly 100 books, when I finish off 50 books, I plan to “re-enlist” and start in on the next 50.

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  2. I finished Classical Women Poets a few days ago and just posted my review. I will finish The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf tomorrow.

    Next I’ll be reading Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz: Selected Works.

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  3. Pingback: A Classics Club Group Check-In #18 | Pining for the West

  4. Hi Classics Readers! 🙂
    I’ve already finished 1984 by George Orwell but haven’t written any reviews yet. For me it’s an exciting read with an ever-relevant theme. Currently I’m struggling to finish Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, due to its enormous size and its quite long depiction of characters/events. Is anyone has tips/tricks to finish this canon?

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  5. Hello all.
    I’m currently rereading Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and am nearly done with that book. I also just finished reading Castle Rackrent by Maria Edgeworth. I was in a reading slump for a while and I think reading these two books have helped me out of the slump.

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  6. I’ve been in the Classics Club for almost three years now and this is my first Check-In post! I’m behind with my reading – just 18 books so far, but at least I have another 2 years to catch up. I find the Spins help enormously to motivate me to read the classics – I love modern fiction too and often opt for that over one of the classics!

    My Check-In post, listing the books I’ve read so far is here – http://www.booksplease.org/2016/04/16/classics-club-check-in-april-2016/

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  7. And as for my twist on the classics club spin (where I am reading all eight of the next eight Greek plays on my list before the deadline), I have read seven before realizing my library doesn’t have a good edition of Aristophanes’ The Knights which is my #8, so I am waiting for my bookshop to get me a Penguin copy. Which made me think how much I prefer Penguin to other publishers for many classics due to the quality of their footnotes, references, introduction but also in terms of Aristophanes, the quality of the translations. Does anyone else have a favourite publisher for the classics they read?

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    • Penguin is good. I like Oxford too, but the type is tiny. Wordsworth (are they still around?) is bad enough that it’s worth finding a different copy. I like Everyman and NYRB, and Barnes & Noble I only use if it was written in English, and isn’t a translation.

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  8. I’m struggling with my current CC pick, Middlemarch. I’m trying to take it slow & really dig into some info about the author, the setting, etc., because I have discovered that I have a rather low tolerance for Victorian social or slice-of-life novels. But despite the extra effort to connect, I’m just not feeling it and I’m only halfway through book/volume 2. Even though I’m usually comfortable putting down a book that doesn’t click, I don’t want to DNF anything off my CC list. Help! Can anyone else out there who’s read Middlemarch offer some encouragement?

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    • I’m Stephen, and I’m doing fairly well for my first year in. I’ve read seven classics so far, most of them from my English section given that on my blog, April is English Literature month. Recently I finished both “Great Expectations” and “Lord of the Flies”. Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility” is my current project, though at this point my main motivation is to finish it so I can read “Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters”!

      I’m feeling fairly optimistic about making further progress this year: in June and July I’m going to focus on the American Lit section of my list. The biggest challenges will be the medieval and renaissance works, followed by the Russian trio of Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, and Solzhenitsyn.

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    • Hi Looloolooweez
      As a survivor of reading Moby Dick, I think I appreciate struggling through a long novel without a real connection but wanting to finish what I started. I havent read Middlemarch myself although Eliot’s Silas Marner is one of my top ten greatest, so I hope to get there one day. This reply is simply to let you know someone is sympathising with you and wishing you strength. Sometimes I put a long book down after 200 pages and read something short and completely different (maybe a children’s classic or a whodunnit) and then come back a little refreshed which may or may not work for you. Another thing might be sitting somewhere different as you read: your garden or a park, a pub at lunchtime, the beach or swimming pool, ….
      Good luck and I hope you finish Middlemarch with some good memories
      Best wishes
      Warren (chronolibrarian)

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    • Hi Looloolooweez
      As a survivor of reading Moby Dick, I think I appreciate struggling through a long novel without a real connection but wanting to finish what I started. I havent read Middlemarch myself although Eliot’s Silas Marner is one of my top ten greatest, so I hope to get there one day. This reply is simply to let you know someone is sympathising with you and wishing you strength. Sometimes I put a long book down after 200 pages and read something short and completely different (maybe a children’s classic or a whodunnit) and then come back a little refreshed which may or may not work for you. Another thing might be sitting somewhere different as you read: your garden or a park, a pub at lunchtime, the beach or swimming pool, ….
      Good luck and I hope you finish Middlemarch with some good memories
      Best wishes
      Warren (chronolibrarian)

      Like

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