Classics Club Event: African-American Literature in February

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Twitter hashtag: #cc12months


All right, clubbers! Today begins the second installment of our Twelve Months of Classic Literature Event with works of and about the Harlem Renaissance and African-American Literature. We are highlighting American literature specifically because February is African History Month in America and Canada, and because the Harlem Renaissance was centered mainly in New York. But obviously works focusing on the African diaspora outside America are entirely encouraged, as are works on the topic before and after the Harlem Renaissance. Please reinterpret this theme however it inspires your participation.

The African-American Lit event is for the current month, but honestly, you can contribute thoughts and post links to the comments below whenever you write them. The purpose of this event is to have a central place to share our thoughts/posts on the topic.

We want to know what you read and what you think about this topic, but we don’t want to research for you. We’re excited to see how this club shapes this month’s topic. We’re a great mix of experts and new readers. We want to encourage you all to share and explore. Use the links above to get started.

Even if you don’t have time to read for the event this month, you could post about the titles you have on your club list that pertain to this month’s topic, write an informative post for fellow clubbers on the topic, or talk about why you didn’t include any titles from the topic on your club list. Feature an author! Write a poem! Explore classic art that accentuates the literature. It’s your event. Research-based posts, free-writing, emotion-based “I love this topic” journal entries, lists – all are welcome and encouraged. Some of you may be experts (or experts in progress) on this month’s topic. Your input is highly encouraged and appreciated! Others are new to literature. For you and the experts, exploration is encouraged.

Please see our main event page for details. 

So, are you in? What will you be reading/writing? 🙂

Cheers, and a very happy reading and writing month to you! – The Club

File:Frederick Douglass portrait.jpg

Our muse this month.

SHARE links and thoughts about this month’s topic BELOW!


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10 thoughts on “Classics Club Event: African-American Literature in February

  1. Pingback: Calendars, My Classics Club List Version 3.0 (& One More Challenge!) | jackiemania

  2. I’m new here, and pretty excited to participate in this monthly challenge! I’m going to read, “Violets and Other Tales”, by Alice Moore Dunbar-Nelson. She was an African American woman born 1875 as one of the first generations of free blacks: died in 1935. Poet, journalist. and political activist, she was one of the prominent starters of the Harlem Renaissance movement. Here I go, ready to read. 🙂

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  3. One for sure that I’ll be reading is Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup. The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, along with some other organizations, is sponsoring a screening of the movie and panel discussion that I plan on attending in late February. Of course I want to read the book first–I’m always fascinated by how books are translated into film. Here’s the link if any clubbers live in the area: http://www.harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/worxcms_published/calendar_page795.shtml

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  4. They’re not on my list, but I’m going to use this opportunity to revisit Chester Himes’ crime novels, awesome books that I’ve never written anything about. Which is clearly a grave oversight.

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